We are pleased we are now in the Yellow Readiness Level, which means face to face activities can resume outdoors and indoors with an approved Risk Assessment, residentials can resume for upto 6 people.

Frequention Asked Questions

Would you like to know more?

Our Group

Where We Meet

Address

1st Hardingstone
The Scout Hut, High Street
Northampton NN4 6BD
United Kingdom
Phone: 07412671388
Email: contact-us@1sthardingstone.org.uk
Url: https://www.1sthardingstone.org.uk

Meeting Times

Moving On: Scouts

If you’re a Scout leader welcoming new faces

  • Regularly link up with the sections above yours regardless of if you’re working on the moving on process together – doing so will help you build relationships, plan joint activities and share ideas.
  • Go to Cub meetings, joint camps or outings to get to know everyone – leading on games and activities where possible.
  • Work with Cub leaders to move new starters together, rather than by themselves.
  • Keep new starters in pairs, so they always have a friend by their side.

If you’re a Cub leader saying goodbye

  • Regularly link up with the sections above yours regardless of if you’re working on the moving on process together – doing so will help you build relationships, plan joint activities and share ideas.
  • Remind Cubs of former members who have since moved on to Scouts, to reassure them familiar faces are waiting on the other side.
  • Encourage young people to complete their Moving On Award, which involves spending three weeks with their potential new group while keeping up their regular routine. Doing so helps them make friends and familiarise themselves with how things will work in their new section.
  • Consider having a moving on ceremony to celebrate all the skills & adventures Cubs have learned during their time with you, and to help them process the change.
  • For more information there is The Scouts Website

I’m the parent of a Cub with additional needs. I’m not sure they’re ready for Scouts. Is there flexibility around the age they move on?

In the right circumstances, yes. Everyone at Scouts should face a similar amount of challenge, and everyone’s individual needs are always taken in account when making decisions. More information on flexibility and reasonable adjustments can be found at Inclusion and Diversity | Scouts. Generally, leaders will keep to the suggested age ranges, unless young people need a little extra time due to additional needs or exceptional circumstances.

When the time to take the leap does come, our visual resources are ideal for those who need a bit of extra help. They’re particularly useful for young people with additional needs – and young people on the autism spectrum – especially if prone to increased anxiety around change.

I’m a Cub moving on to Scouts. What will happen?

Moving on to Scouts is a really exciting time, but you might also feel a little sad about saying farewell to some of your fellow Cubs. This is an understandable reaction to change and it’s okay to feel nervous and unsure. Remember though that some of your friends will already be Scouts, which will help make the transition easier.

In the run up to your last night at Cubs, your Cub leader will talk to your new Scout leader – who you may have already met during joint activities. Together, they’ll make the move as easy as possible for you.

Although most Cubs move up to Scouts between the ages of 9 ½ and 11, leaders can be flexible in cases where a Cub may need a bit more time due to additional needs or exceptional circumstances. Generally, they’ll also have a think about when your friends are moving, and time things so that you can start your new adventure together where possible.

To get you extra prepared, your leader might tell you about the Moving on Award. Completing it involves spending at least three weeks with a Scout section, while keeping up your normal routine at Cubs. During that time, you’ll see what Scouts is really like – getting to know your new leaders, making new friends and participating in lots of new and exciting activities. Keep an eye out, as you might even spot some familiar faces from when you first started at Cubs!

Beaver Uniform

Beavers Uniform and Badge Placement

What do Beavers wear?

Beaver uniform consists of a blue sweatshirt with your badges sewn on and a coloured scarf or ‘necker’ to represent your local group. There are lots of other optional accessories you can wear such as hats, hoodies, navy blue trousers or shorts, if you’d like to.

Why is uniform important?

Wearing a uniform is comfy and practical. It means you can run around and get messy without ruining your other clothes. It makes you feel part of a team. It means no one feels uncomfortable or left out. And it gives you a place to show off all the brilliant badges you earn

Here’s where to sew on those badges…

  1. Wales Badge
  2. Group name tape
  3. Scotland/ Northern Ireland Badge
  4. District Badge
  5. County/ Area/ Region Badge
  6. Group badge (if not warn on scarf)
  7. Leadership stripe
  8. Union Flag
  9. Gallantry/ Meritorious Conduct awards
  1. Chief Scout’s Award
  2. Challenge Awards
  3. Wales Badge
  4. Occasional Badge
  5. Joining in Awards
  6. Membership Awards
  7. Activity Badges and Staged Activity Badges
  8. Group Badge (if worn on scarf)

Where can I buy it?

Uniform can either be bought from our online shop – Scout Store. If you’re stuck, ask adult volunteers to tell you more about what to buy and where to buy it. If cost is an issue, they will be more than happy to help.

Uniform & Badges

Beavers Uniform and Badge Placement

What do Beavers wear?

Beaver uniform consists of a blue sweatshirt with your badges sewn on and a coloured scarf or ‘necker’ to represent your local group. There are lots of other optional accessories you can wear such as hats, hoodies, navy blue trousers or shorts, if you’d like to.

Why is uniform important?

Wearing a uniform is comfy and practical. It means you can run around and get messy without ruining your other clothes. It makes you feel part of a team. It means no one feels uncomfortable or left out. And it gives you a place to show off all the brilliant badges you earn

Here’s where to sew on those badges…

  1. Wales Badge
  2. Group name tape
  3. Scotland/ Northern Ireland Badge
  4. District Badge
  5. County/ Area/ Region Badge
  6. Group badge (if not warn on scarf)
  7. Leadership stripe
  8. Union Flag
  9. Gallantry/ Meritorious Conduct awards
  1. Chief Scout’s Award
  2. Challenge Awards
  3. Wales Badge
  4. Occasional Badge
  5. Joining in Awards
  6. Membership Awards
  7. Activity Badges and Staged Activity Badges
  8. Group Badge (if worn on scarf)

Where can I buy it?

Uniform can either be bought from our online shop – Scout Store. If you’re stuck, ask adult volunteers to tell you more about what to buy and where to buy it. If cost is an issue, they will be more than happy to help.

Cubs Uniform and Badge Placement

What do Cubs wear?

Cub uniform consists of a green sweatshirt with your badges sewn on and a coloured scarf or ‘necker’ to represent your local group. There are lots of other optional accessories you can wear such as hats, hoodies, navy blue trousers or shorts.

Why is uniform important?

Wearing a uniform is comfy and practical. It means no one feels uncomfortable or left out and helps everyone feel part of the Pack. It also gives you a place to show off all the badges you earn.

Here’s where to sew your badges…

  1. Wales badge
  2. Group name tape
  3. District badge
  4. County/ Area/ Region badge
  5. Group badge (if not warn on scarf)
  6. Leadership stripe
  7. Union Flag
  8. Gallantry/ Meritorious Conduct Awards
  9. Chief Scout’s Award
  1. Challenge Awards
  2. Wales Badge
  3. Occasional Badges
  4. Moving On Award
  5. Joining In Awards
  6. Membership Award
  7. Activity and Staged Activity Badges
  8. Group badge (if worn on scarf)

Where to buy your uniform

Uniform can either be bought from our online shop – Scout Store. If you’re not sure where to start, adult volunteers can give you more information about what to buy and where to buy it.

Scout Uniform And Badge Placement

What do Scouts wear?

Scouts wear a uniform during their weekly meetings and sometimes on trips away, depending on where they’re going and what they’re doing. Usually, this consists of a teal green shirt or blouse with their badges sewn on, which they pair with a scarf, known as a necker. Exact uniforms will vary slightly if your Troop is part of the Air Scouts or Sea Scouts. 

Alongside their shirts, Scouts might wear the accompanying blue uniform trousers or skirt, or they might save their uniform bottoms to wear for special occasions like awards ceremonies and public events – choosing to wear something more casual with their shirt during the week.   Optional accessories such as hats, hoodies, are also available.

  1. Wales badge
  2. Group name tape
  3. Scotland/ Northern Ireland Badge
  4. District Badge
  5. County/ Area/ Region Badge
  6. Group badge (if not warn on scarf)
  7. Patrol Badge
  8. Leadership stripe
  9. Union Flag
  10. Group Name tape
  11. Chief Scout’s Award

Additionally, here are the diagrams for the other Scout uniforms.

  1. Challenge Awards
  2. Wales Badge
  3. Occasional Badges
  4. Moving On Award
  5. Joining In Awards
  6. Membership Award
  7. Activity and Staged Activity Badges
  8. Group badge (if worn on scarf)

Where to buy your uniform

Uniform can either be bought from our online shop – Scout Store. If you’re not sure where to start, adult volunteers can give you more information about what to buy and where to buy it.

Cub Uniform

Cubs Uniform and Badge Placement

What do Cubs wear?

Cub uniform consists of a green sweatshirt with your badges sewn on and a coloured scarf or ‘necker’ to represent your local group. There are lots of other optional accessories you can wear such as hats, hoodies, navy blue trousers or shorts.

Why is uniform important?

Wearing a uniform is comfy and practical. It means no one feels uncomfortable or left out and helps everyone feel part of the Pack. It also gives you a place to show off all the badges you earn.

Here’s where to sew your badges…

  1. Wales badge
  2. Group name tape
  3. District badge
  4. County/ Area/ Region badge
  5. Group badge (if not warn on scarf)
  6. Leadership stripe
  7. Union Flag
  8. Gallantry/ Meritorious Conduct Awards
  9. Chief Scout’s Award
  1. Challenge Awards
  2. Wales Badge
  3. Occasional Badges
  4. Moving On Award
  5. Joining In Awards
  6. Membership Award
  7. Activity and Staged Activity Badges
  8. Group badge (if worn on scarf)

Where to buy your uniform

Uniform can either be bought from our online shop – Scout Store. If you’re not sure where to start, adult volunteers can give you more information about what to buy and where to buy it.

Scout Uniform

Scout Uniform And Badge Placement

What do Scouts wear?

Scouts wear a uniform during their weekly meetings and sometimes on trips away, depending on where they’re going and what they’re doing. Usually, this consists of a teal green shirt or blouse with their badges sewn on, which they pair with a scarf, known as a necker. Exact uniforms will vary slightly if your Troop is part of the Air Scouts or Sea Scouts. 

Alongside their shirts, Scouts might wear the accompanying blue uniform trousers or skirt, or they might save their uniform bottoms to wear for special occasions like awards ceremonies and public events – choosing to wear something more casual with their shirt during the week.   Optional accessories such as hats, hoodies, are also available.

  1. Wales badge
  2. Group name tape
  3. Scotland/ Northern Ireland Badge
  4. District Badge
  5. County/ Area/ Region Badge
  6. Group badge (if not warn on scarf)
  7. Patrol Badge
  8. Leadership stripe
  9. Union Flag
  10. Group Name tape
  11. Chief Scout’s Award

Additionally, here are the diagrams for the other Scout uniforms.

  1. Challenge Awards
  2. Wales Badge
  3. Occasional Badges
  4. Moving On Award
  5. Joining In Awards
  6. Membership Award
  7. Activity and Staged Activity Badges
  8. Group badge (if worn on scarf)

Where to buy your uniform

Uniform can either be bought from our online shop – Scout Store. If you’re not sure where to start, adult volunteers can give you more information about what to buy and where to buy it.

Scout Promise & Variants

Scout Promise: Sikh

On my honour,
I promise that I will do my best,
to do my duty to Waheguru and to The Queen,
to help other people,
and to keep the Scout Law.

Scout Promise: Muslim

In the name of Allah, the most beneficent and the most merciful,
I promise that I will do my best,
to do my duty to Allah and then to the Queen,
to help other people,
and to keep the Scout Law.

Scout Promise: Jewish

On my honour,
I promise that I will do my best,
to do my duty to God and to the Queen,
to help other people,
and to keep the Scout Law.

Scout Promise: Humanist

On my honour,
I promise that I will do my best,
to uphold our Scout values, to do my duty to the Queen,
to help other people,
and to keep the Scout Law.

Scout Promise: Hindu

On my honour,
I promise that I will do my best,
to follow my dharma and do my duty to the Queen,
to act with compassion towards all life,
and to keep the Scout Law.

Scout Promise: Christian

On my honour,
I promise that I will do my best,
to do my duty to God and to the Queen,
to help other people,
and to keep the Scout Law.

Scout Promise: Buddhist

On my honour,
I promise that I will do my best,
to seek refuge in the Triple Gem, to do my duty to the Queen,
to act with compassion towards all life,
and to keep the Scout Law.

Scout Promise: Atheist or of no faith background

On my honour, I promise that I will do my best,
to uphold our Scout values, to do my duty to The Queen,
to help other people,
and to keep the Scout Law.

Beaver Promise & Variants

Beaver Scout Promise: Humanist

I promise to do my best and to be kind and helpful and to love our world.

Beaver Scout Promise: Buddhist

I promise to do my best to be kind and helpful and to act with love towards everyone.

Beaver Scout Promise: Sikh

I promise to do my best and to be kind and helpful and to love Waheguru. 

Beaver Scout Promise: Jewish

I promise to do my best and to be kind and helpful and to love God

Beaver Scout Promise: Atheist, Agnostic or no faith

I promise to do my best,
to be kind and helpful,
and to love our world.

Beaver Scout Promise: Hindu

Variant 1
I promise to do my best,
to be kind and helpful,
and to love God.

Variant 2
I promise to do my best,
to be kind and helpful,
and to love my Dharma.

There are many different approaches to Hinduism. Some Hindus will accept „God‟ but others do not agree with the concept of an omnipotent God and therefore will prefer to use “my Dharma” (meaning “the divine force which directs my life‟)

Scouting is available to all faiths and must therefore take account of the different religious obligations of its Members (scouts.org.uk)

Beaver Scout Promise: Muslim

Variant 1
I promise to do my best,
to be kind and helpful
and to love God.

Variant 2
I promise to do my best,
to be kind and helpful
and to love Allah.

There are many different approaches to Islam.
Many will accept the term “God” (meaning “Allah”), some Muslims may prefer to use their term “Allah”.

Scouting is available to all faiths and must therefore take account of the different religious obligations of its Members (scouts.org.uk)

Beaver Scout Promise: Christian

I promise to do my best,
to be kind and helpful,
and to love God.

Beaver Scout: Core Promise

I promise to do my best,
to be kind and helpful,
and to love God.

Cub Promise & Variants

Cub Scout Promise: Sikh

I promise that I will do my best,
to do my duty to Waheguru and to the Queen,
to help other people
and to keep the Cub Scout Law.

Cub Scout Promise: Jewish

I promise that I will do my best
to do my duty to God and to the Queen,
to help other people,
and to keep the Cub Scout Law.

Cub Scout Promise: Humanist

I promise that I will do my best,
to uphold our Scout values, to do my duty to the Queen,
to help other people,
and to keep the Cub Scout Law.

Cub Scout Promise: Hindu

I promise that I will do my best,
to follow my dharma and do my duty to the Queen,
to act with compassion towards all life,
and to keep the Cub Scout Law.

Cub Scout Promise: Buddhists

I promise that I will do my best,
to seek refuge in the Triple Gem, to do my duty to the Queen,
to act with compassion towards all life,
and to keep the Cub Scout Law.

Cub Scout Promise: Atheist or of no faith background

I promise that I will do my best,
to uphold our Scout values, to do my duty to The Queen,
to help other people,
and to keep the Cub Scout Law.

Cub Scout Promise: Muslim

I promise that I will do my best,
to do my duty to Allah,
and then to the Queen,
to help other people,
and to keep the Cub Scout Law.

Cub Scout Promise: Christian

I promise that I will do my best,
to do my duty to God,
and to the Queen,
to help other people,
and to keep the Cub Scout Law.

Cub Scout: Core Promise

I promise that I will do my best,
to do my duty to God,
and to the Queen,
to help other people,
and to keep the Cub Scout Law.

Moving on: Cubs

I’m a Beaver moving on to Cubs. What will happen?

Moving on to Cubs is a really exciting time, but you might also feel a little sad about saying farewell to some of your fellow Beavers. This is an understandable reaction to change and it’s okay to feel nervous and unsure.

In the run up to your last night at Beavers, your Beaver leader will talk to your new Cub leader – who you may have already met during joint activities. Together, they’ll make the move as easy as possible for you.

Although most Beavers move up to Cubs between the ages of 7 ½ and 8 ½, leaders can be flexible in cases where a Beaver may need a bit more time due to additional needs or exceptional circumstances. Generally, they’ll also have a think about when your friends are moving, and time things so that you can start your new adventure together where possible.

To get you extra prepared, your leader might tell you about the Moving on Award. Completing it involves spending at least three weeks with a Cub section, while keeping up your normal routine at Beavers. During that time, you’ll see what Cubs is really like – getting to know your new leaders, making new friends and participating in lots of new and exciting activities. Keep an eye out, as you might even spot some familiar faces from when you first started at Beavers!

I’m the parent of a Beaver with additional needs. I’m not sure they’re ready for Cubs. Is there flexibility around the age they move on?

In the right circumstances, yes. Everyone at Scouts should face a similar amount of challenge, and everyone’s individual needs are always taken in account when making decisions. More information on flexibility and reasonable adjustments can be found at Inclusion and Diversity | Scouts. Generally, leaders will keep to the suggested age ranges, unless young people need a little extra time due to additional needs or exceptional circumstances.

When the time to take the leap does come, our visual resources are ideal for those who need a bit of extra help. They’re particularly useful for young people with additional needs – and young people on the autism spectrum – especially if prone to increased anxiety around change.

If you’re a Beaver leader saying goodbye

  • Regularly link up with the sections above yours regardless of if you’re working on the moving on process together – doing so will help you build relationships, plan joint activities and share ideas.
  • Remind Beavers of former members who have since moved on to Cubs, to reassure them familiar faces are waiting on the other side.
  • Encourage young people to complete their Moving On Award, which involves spending three weeks with their potential new group while keeping up their regular routine. Doing so helps them make friends and familiarise themselves with how things will work in their new section.
  • Direct Beavers to the Cub pages of their Beaver Logbook – available from Scout Store. Here, there is space for them to write down the names of their new leaders and to draw themselves as a Cub Scout. Ask them: what do they think will be different about Cubs? What will stay the same?
  • Consider having a moving on ceremony to celebrate all the skills Beavers have learned during their time with you, and to help them process the change.

If you’re a Cub leader welcoming new faces

  • Regularly link up with the sections above yours regardless of if you’re working on the moving on process together – doing so will help you build relationships, plan joint activities and share ideas.
  • Go to Beaver meetings, joint camps or outings to get to know everyone – leading on games and activities where possible.
  • Work with Beaver leaders to move new starters together, rather than by themselves.
  • Keep new starters in pairs, so they always have a friend by their side.
  • Direct new starters and parents to the Cubs Activity Log – available from Scout Store. It contains basic information about being a Cub and has space for the young person to write down the information they learn about the Pack as they go.

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